Monday, October 19, 2015

3 Morning Planets and this week's hi-lites

Mars,Jupiter and Venus in this morning's sky.Mercury is also visible but
below the trees in this graphic.
http://users.eastlink.ca/~jmnorman/gif/planets.gif


This week's astronomy hi-lites from https://stardate.org :

October 19: Orionid Meteors
The Orionid meteor shower is expected to peak before dawn on Thursday, with
up to a dozen meteors per hour. The Orionids tend to spread out a bit, so
you can generally see almost as many meteors for a day or two before and
after the shower's peak.

October 20: Pisces
Pisces, the fishes, which is one of the constellations of the zodiac, is in
the eastern sky after nightfall. It is faint, though, so you need a dark sky
to see it.

October 21: Alderamin
Alderamin, the brightest star of Cepheus, the king, shines high in the
northern sky. It stands directly above Polaris, the North Star, a couple of
hours after sunset. Alderamin is a white star, about 50 light-years from
Earth.

October 22: Morning Trio
A bright trio adorns the morning sky: Venus, Jupiter, and Mars. Venus, the
"morning star," stands at the top of the lineup tomorrow, in the east at
dawn. Jupiter is close to the lower left of Venus, with fainter Mars to the
lower left of Jupiter.

October 23: Venus and Jupiter
The planet Venus, the "morning star," is well up in the eastern sky at first
light. Over the next few days, it will pass quite close to the
next-brightest object in the night sky, the planet Jupiter.

October 24: Hamal
The yellow-orange star Hamal decorates the forehead of Aries, the ram.
Thousands of years ago, it was near the Sun at the spring equinox, making it
an important star in many cultures.

October 25: Sheratan
Sheratan, the second-brightest star of Aries, the ram, is low in the east as
night falls this evening, far to the left of the Moon. To the eye alone, the
star looks like a single pinpoint of light, yet Sheratan actually is a
system of two stars.


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